Data Over Sound

Just saw this mentioned. It’s interesting how an idea that, years ago, was just a method of harnessing existing technology, can re-appear as something funky and brand new. It joins those other technologies that aim to get data into our devices via cost-free, non-contact interfaces, such as QR Codes.

What is Chirp?

A Chirp™ is a sonic barcode. With Chirp technology, data and content can be encoded into a unique audio stream. Any device with a speaker can transmit a chirp and most devices with a microphone can decode them.

People of a certain age will be familiar with the use of audio cassettes as storage for their microcomputer programs back in the 1980s – I think I used reel-to-reel for a time.

I also remember, round about 1980, sending a computer program over the phone to a friend’s house by holding the phone close to the speaker and picking the sound up at the other end with a microphone. As I recall, our version wasn’t really very reliable or practical, but I think we did succeed in sending a short program. Obviously we were inspired by the audio coupler modems that we might have seen in films and documentaries.

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SMPTE and MIDI timecodes can be recorded as audio signals on analogue tape and can survive multiple transfers and, I dare say, would be robust enough to work over a speaker-microphone link.

In the 1990s we were all familiar with ‘the sound of data’ when we used dial-up modems.

Over the years we have also had DTMF dialling, audio watermarking, Shazam, Siri, Alexa etc. and phone-based automated systems using speech recognition, all of which have to deal with extracting ‘data’ from noisy audio. You would think that the new audio barcodes should be pretty simple to make work reliably.

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